What is Speech-Language Therapy?

Irving ISD offers a continuum of speech-language therapy services for students with a Speech Impairment that results in an adverse affect on the child’s academic or functional performance and results in the need of specially designed services by a Licensed Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP) and/or Licensed Speech-Language Pathology Assistant (SLP-Assistant).  Speech Impairment encompasses

 

  • Articulation disorders refers to difficulty producing speech sounds that are age or developmentally appropriate for the child.

  • Language disorders refers to difficulties with vocabulary, sentence structures, or the use of language that is developmentally appropriate for the child.

  • Fluency disorders refers to sound, word, or phrase repetitions, prolongations and/or blocks in speech production that may be accompanied by secondary characteristics (i.e. facial grimaces, blinking, physical movement).

  • Voice disorders refers to a medical diagnosis by an Otolaryngologist (ENT) that results in an academic or functional deficit.

 

Cultural and linguistic diversity factors are considered when determining a Speech Impairment.

 

The Continuum of Speech Therapy Services may include direct speech therapy and/or indirect speech therapy.

 

Direct Speech Therapy Services include services provided directly by the Licensed Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP) and/or Licensed Speech-Language Pathology Assistant (SLP-Assistant)  with the student in a small group. The location of direct speech therapy services may vary within the school setting.

 

Indirect Speech Therapy Services include services under the direction of the Licensed Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP) and/or Licensed Speech-Language Pathology Assistant (SLP-Assistant). These services may include the SLP and/or SLP Assistant consultation and/or collaboration with the classroom teacher or other service providers to promote progress on the child’s speech/language/communication goals.

 

Dismissal From Speech Therapy Services is based on the child’s progress on speech/language/communication goals. Some examples of when your child will be considered for dismissal from speech therapy services include:

 

  • Mastery of all goals/objectives in the IEP and formal and/or informal testing data indicates that a disorder no longer exists.

  • Speech/Language/Communication deficits are more appropriately served through other services provided.

  • Speech-Language Disorder no longer interferes with progress in the educational process/curriculum and there is no longer an educational need for therapy.

  • Documentation from speech therapy sessions showing that your child demonstrates a consistent lack of progress and a variety of evidence-based practices have been attempted with little or no progress. The ARD committee will discuss and explore all options for a continuum of support services and determine if dismissal from speech therapy services is appropriate.